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Uncompromising in quality and uniquely Māori 

Āhua brings you a wide-ranging collection of taonga Māori from our Master carvers and weavers, alongside Māori artists and practitioners throughout Aotearoa.

New Zealand Maori Arts & Crafts dedicated Exhibition Gallery for all the taonga created within the Wananga.  Beautiful works of arts from our National Schools and Graduated Artists are displayed for your veiwing pleasure.  Visit Te Puia and participate in a Guided Experience - Te Ra and you will get to visit the schools where all the action happens before visiting our very special Ahua Gallery. 

Whats even better, you can request a tailor made taonga! Visit our Commission a Project at NZMACI.  From sentimental whānau pieces to significant commissioned projects, NZMACI can design, create and deliver your taonga.

If you would like to know some more about our Tumu (Head of Schools) and Pouako (Tutors) please visit our Artists page.

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Kākahu (Contemporary) - 3440TA

The kākahu takes inspiration from traditional Māori cloaks. A kākahu is mantle of prestige and honour. This kākahu is made from mirowhiti miro (mop yarn) also incorporating materials that represent different types of kākahu including but not limited to kahu huruhuru (feathers) and tāniko.

Material: Mop String, Cotton, Wool, Feathers

Measurements: 1140mm x 725mm
$4,800.00

Tipare Tāniko & Pōtae - 5105AY

Tāniko weaving produces a relatively stiff and unyielding fabric, so it was traditionally used to embellish korowai cloaks and other items such as headbands, belts, and jewellery. Often several different strips of tāniko appeared on up to three sides of a korowai cloak.

The tāniko was inspired by the pōtae (hat) made of quality New Zealand wool and designed to accentuate it.

Artist meaning: Aramoana Tipare tāniko features the Aramoana (zigzag) pattern – Aramoana means ‘the pathway to the sea’ and represents many destinations by ocean and waterway. The pathway signifying growth and moving forward in life.

Material: Cotton, Elastic, Synthetic Wool

Circumference: 22 inches (56cm)
$1,270.00

Kete Kai - 5164AM

Kete Kai is a food gathering basket that is typical used to house food from the ocean or the land. Kete kai was used for every type of food that was gathered. You were not allowed to mix land food kete with the ocean food kete as it was tapu. The pattern on this kete kai is taki tahi and the holes are called puareare.

Material: Harakeke

Measurements: 390mm x 280mm
$590.00

Hei Tiki - 5292IR

Hei tiki are the best known of all Māori adornments. Tiki are symbols of fertility that depict a new-born child. They are often family heirlooms bearing personal names and embodying their wearers lineage. As with most Māori personal adornments, hei tiki are often passed down generationally.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 107mm x 50mm x 15mm
$1,900.00

Hei Tiki - 5293IR

Hei tiki are the best known of all Māori adornments. Tiki are symbols of fertility that depict a new-born child. They are often family heirlooms bearing personal names and embodying their wearers lineage. As with most Māori personal adornments, hei tiki are often passed down generationally.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 107mm x 60mm x 14mm
$1,900.00

Pōria Kākā - 4460IA

Pōria Kākā are leg rings crafted from bone or stone used to keep pet kākā (parrots) from flying away. The giant kaka parrot was used by the Māori to assist them during hunting. The bird was used as a decoy to capture other kaka parrots.

As with many Māori items the kaka ring was both used as a tool as well as an adornment.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 42mm x 31mm x 6mm
$410.00