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Picture for category Te Takapū - National Stone & Bone Carving School

Te Takapū - National Stone & Bone Carving School

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At Te Takapū, students learn the revered tradition of carving pounamu (Nephrite-Jade/Greenstone), bone and stone.

The school opened on 5 October 2009, expanding on NZMACI’s commitment to maintaining, developing and promoting the arts, crafts and culture of iwi Māori (Māori tribes) as mandated by the New Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts Institute Act (1963) (History).

The school was first led by Lewis Gardiner who is a well-regarded pounamu artist of his generation.

Stacy Gordine, a renowned artist from the East Coast of New Zealand – and uri of Hone Te Kauru and Pine Taiapa – now leads the programme and is shaping the direction of the wānanga into the future.

Would you like something custom made especially for you?  Commission a piece here

3 Items in Grid 4 Items in Grid List

Hei Tiki - 4390PD

Hei tiki are the best known of all Māori adornments. Tiki are symbols of fertility that depict a new-born child. They are often family heirlooms bearing personal names and embodying their wearers lineage. As with most Māori personal adornments, hei tiki are often passed down generationally.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 102mm x 54mm
$2,250.00

Marakihau

Marakihau were believed to harass and prey on shore-living people or sea-travellers. Some were said to be the spirits of departed men, an example being the famed chief Te Tahi, ancestor of the Awa people of Whakatane where a marakihau carving decorates a meeting house.

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 130mm x 50mm
$2,900.00

Pātītī - 0108LN

To create a pātītī, an iron axe-head was fastened to a carved timber or whalebone handle resulting in a weapon that was practical and uniquely decorated. Prior to the introduction of the musket, the pātītī was a weapon favoured by Māori in the New Zealand Land Wars.

Material: Handle: Parāoa (Whalebone) & Blade: Steel

Measurements: 410mm x 130mm
$6,500.00

Heru - 3755IR

Heru were produced in varying shapes and sizes and were made from wood, and in some instance’s whalebone. These combs were highly valued as personal heirlooms and were consequently passed down from one generation to the next, often acquiring their own personal names. The combs were mostly decorative and held the pūtikitiki (top knot) in place. When a comb was broken, it was placed in a swamp or some sacred place for safe keeping because the head was the most sacred part of the body and therefore tapu (sacred).

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 180mm x 30mm
$990.00

Māhē - 3570TD

Māhē are sinker stones used to weigh down fishing nets.

Material: Onewa (Greywacke)

Measurements: 65mm x 38mm x 35mm
$290.00

Hei Niho - 3792HW

Shark teeth were highly sought after to wear as a symbol of prestige for personal adornment. They were reflective of the mana of the shark itself.

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 83mm x 45mm x 7mm
$220.00

Rei Niho - 3789IA

The mark of a high Chief was one who wore the hei niho (whale tooth pendant), as the teeth of the sperm whale were highly prized because of their rarity. Usually these pendants had simply etched out eyes to form a head at one end. With actual whale teeth being such a rarity, it became common to fashion the tooth form from other materials.

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 67mm x 40mm
$250.00

Rei Niho - 3880TO

The mark of a high Chief was one who wore the hei niho (whale tooth pendant), as the teeth of the sperm whale were highly prized because of their rarity. Usually these pendants had simply etched out eyes to form a head at one end. With actual whale teeth being such a rarity, it became common to fashion the tooth form from other materials.

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 60mm x 21mm
$220.00

Rei Niho - 5265IA

The mark of a high Chief was one who wore the hei niho (whale tooth pendant), as the teeth of the sperm whale were highly prized because of their rarity. Usually these pendants had simply etched out eyes to form a head at one end. With actual whale teeth being such a rarity, it became common to fashion the tooth form from other materials.

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 78mm x 26mm x 4mm
$220.00

Rei Niho - 5266IA

The mark of a high Chief was one who wore the hei niho (whale tooth pendant), as the teeth of the sperm whale were highly prized because of their rarity. Usually these pendants had simply etched out eyes to form a head at one end. With actual whale teeth being such a rarity, it became common to fashion the tooth form from other materials.

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 60mm x 33mm x 4mm
$220.00

Rei Niho - 5268IA

The mark of a high Chief was one who wore the hei niho (whale tooth pendant), as the teeth of the sperm whale were highly prized because of their rarity. Usually these pendants had simply etched out eyes to form a head at one end. With actual whale teeth being such a rarity, it became common to fashion the tooth form from other materials.

Material: Onewa (NZ Greywacke)

Measurements: 61mm x 42mm x 5mm
$290.00

Hei Matau - 4380IA

Coastal and river-based Māori tribes traditionally used a variety of fishhooks and lures. Hooks and lures varied in shape, material and design. Today hei matau (fishhooks) have become symbolic of traditional Māori technology and continue to symbolize a relationship to Tangaroa, God of the sea.

Material: Koiwi (Beef Bone)

Measurements: 24mm x 20mm
$250.00