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Picture for category Te Takapū - National Stone & Bone Carving School

Te Takapū - National Stone & Bone Carving School

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At Te Takapū, students learn the revered tradition of carving pounamu (Nephrite-Jade/Greenstone), bone and stone.

The school opened on 5 October 2009, expanding on NZMACI’s commitment to maintaining, developing and promoting the arts, crafts and culture of iwi Māori (Māori tribes) as mandated by the New Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts Institute Act (1963) (History).

The school was first led by Lewis Gardiner who is a well-regarded pounamu artist of his generation.

Stacy Gordine, a renowned artist from the East Coast of New Zealand – and uri of Hone Te Kauru and Pine Taiapa – now leads the programme and is shaping the direction of the wānanga into the future.

Would you like something custom made especially for you?  Commission a piece here

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Kurupapa - 4475PD

Kurupapa are long slender pendants typically crafted from pounamu (NZ Jade) or bone. Customarily they were very popular personal adornments. Kurupapa are still commonly worn as pendants and earrings. As with most Māori personal adornments kurupapa are often passed down generationally.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 162mm x 20mm
$450.00

Kurupapa - 4478KC

Kurupapa are long slender pendants typically crafted from pounamu (NZ Jade) or bone. Customarily they were very popular personal adornments. Kurupapa are still commonly worn as pendants and earrings. As with most Māori personal adornments kurupapa are often passed down generationally.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 122mm x 9mm
$450.00

Mako Earrings - 5458MA

Shark teeth were highly sought after to wear as a symbol of prestige for personal adornment. They were reflective of the mana of the shark itself. These earrings are in reference to the Mako shark.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 50mm x 20mm x 16mm
$450.00

Whakakaipiko - 4479HF

Whakakaipiko (Aupiko) forms were given as a symbol of endearment. Whakakaipiko are long and slender personal adornments characterised by a ‘piko’ or kink in the body of the pendant. Customarily they were used as a pin for fastening cloaks and may be made from bone, stone, wood or shell. Whakakaipiko are commonly worn as pendants.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 145mm x 14mm
$450.00

Mōtoi Mako Taika - 4496HW

Shark teeth were highly sought after to wear as a symbol of prestige for personal adornment. They were reflective of the mana of the shark itself.

These mōtoi (earrings) were replicated from a mako (shark) tooth. The shark holds many symbolic meanings to Māori. They are characters in stories, tattooed on the skin and their teeth worn as adornments. These mōtoi symbolise strength and determination.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 27mm x 20mm x 5mm
$390.00

Hei Tiki - 5292IR

Hei tiki are the best known of all Māori adornments. Tiki are symbols of fertility that depict a new-born child. They are often family heirlooms bearing personal names and embodying their wearers lineage. As with most Māori personal adornments, hei tiki are often passed down generationally.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 107mm x 50mm x 15mm
$1,900.00

Niho Mangō - 4494HW

Shark teeth were highly sought after to wear as a symbol of prestige for personal adornment. They were reflective of the mana of the shark itself. This tooth pendant references the tiger shark. This shark is an aggressive predator and is found mostly in tropical and warm waters. Tiger sharks are named for the dark, vertical stripes found mainly on juveniles.

Material: NZ Greenstone (Karikitea)

Measurements: 100mm x 75mm x 20mm
$690.00

Niho Mangō - 5407KH

Shark teeth were highly sought after to wear as a symbol of prestige for personal adornment. They were reflective of the mana of the shark itself. This tooth pendant references the tiger shark. This shark is an aggressive predator and is found mostly in tropical and warm waters. Tiger sharks are named for the dark, vertical stripes found mainly on juveniles.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 49mm x 40mm x 9mm
$690.00

Hei Niho - 4490MA

Shark teeth were highly sought after to wear as a symbol of prestige for personal adornment. They were reflective of the mana of the shark itself.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 70mm x 28mm x 7mm
$390.00

Hei Matau - 4487MA

Coastal and river-based Māori tribes traditionally used a variety of fishhooks and lures. Hooks and lures varied in shape, material and design. Today hei matau (fishhooks) have become symbolic of traditional Māori technology and continue to symbolize a relationship to Tangaroa, God of the sea.

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 37mm x 34mm x 8mm
$420.00

Kōmore (Anklet) - 5422TO

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 35mm x 10mm x 5mm
$290.00

Kōmore (Anklet) - 5423TO

Material: Pounamu (Kawakawa)

Measurements: 45mm x 8mm x 4mm
$290.00